Area 51 WhistleBlower Found Dead In Apartment… “suicide” of course.

Area 51 WhistleBlower Found Dead In Apartment… “suicide” of course.

Two possibilities exist: Either we are alone in the Universe or we are not. Both are equally terrifying.–Arthur C. Clarke.
Photo by Brooke Denevan on Unsplash

The modest city of Wilsonville, Oregon, is most known for its... well, it’s not known for anything really, but it was the home of a government whistleblower who ‘allegedly’ committed suicide.

The bloated body of Phil Schneider was discovered by Detective Randy Harris, of the Clackamas County Sheriff Department, on January 17, 1996.

Seeing no sign of struggle or defensive wounds on the decedent, the detective hastily determined that Phil’s cause of death was a stroke; not uncommon for an overweight gentleman like Schneider.

And for the blood pooled up on Phil’s carpet?

Simple really, a brain hemorrhage occurred while he was stroking out, after which he falls face first onto his wheelchair, bopping his head, and driving out the blood, which “spilled out of his mouth.”

Phil Schneider’s head was found resting on his wheelchair, but yet there’s a pool of blood on the carpet. Source.

Oddly though, Phil’s body was removed from the scene without the presence of a coroner, a strict violation of Oregon State Law. Friends and family members found this odd, but were more concerned that both the detective and medical examiner overlooked the possible murder weapon wrapped tightly around Phil’s neck.

Phil Schneider’s body was swollen and bruised. Source (uncensored photo)

Exposing A Top-Secret US Navy Experiment

Eighteen months prior to his demise, Phil Schneider traveled the country exposing top-secret government projects; these secret goings-on were funded by what he referred to as the “Black Budget”.

One popular Black Budget lecture topic of Phil’s was the US Navy’s top secret experiment, known as the Philadelphia Project.

The Philadelphia Project, sometimes called ‘Project Rainbow’, was a “top secret radar invisibility (proto-Stealth) experiment” conducted on August 12th, 1943 under the guidance of John von Neumann, a world-renowned Hungarian mathematician, and Nikola Tesla, the Serbian-American electrical engineer commended for his advancements in the theory and wide applications of electromagnetism.

Phil Schneider showing a photo of father aboard the USS Eldridge. Source.

Phil’s father, Oscar Schneider, was directly involved in this secret affair, serving as the senior medical officer aboard the USS Eldridge; a WW2 battleship used for Project Rainbow.

The experiment allegedly focused on teleporting the USS Eldridge, a 25,000 ton Navy Warship, and its crew, hundreds of miles instantly. Apparently, the experiment actually worked and during the first test, the ship teleported from Philadelphia to the Norfolk, Virginia Navy Base — a 200 mile jump — in under 20 minutes.

Photo by Thomas Park on Unsplash

Since the universe isn’t keen on humans breaking into the Earth’s geomagnetic grid, rearranging atoms and the forces that hold them together, the result was an entire ship of dead crewmates, many of them fused together with the bulkhead, cowling supports, and other parts of the ship.

Whether you believe the validity of the experiment or not, it was one of the many Black Budget projects exposed by Phil Schneider, one that the Navy vehemently denies even existed. Searching “Project Rainbow” in the latest CIA document dumps brings up literally pages of proof. It would be crazy to think that the government would ‘get their story straight’ before lying to its public. I digress.

D.U.M.B.S

Another popular topic of Phil Schneider’s lectures was his direct involvement in the construction of Deep Military Underground Bases (D.U.M.B.S). Obtaining a Level 3 Security Clearance, ‘Rhyolite 38’ (a sub category issued to geologist) enabled Phil to have direct access to any of the US Government’s over one-hundred and thirty underground bases.

Trained as a geologist, Phil’s job was to seek out and oversee the construction of these deep underground bases. The construction process of these bases are extremely complex, requiring large drilling equipment to penetrate the Earth’s surface and scrape away hard rock up to two miles underneath.

Phil Schneider’s team of geologist would use enormous drills to dig down two miles below the Earth’s surface. Source.

The team would analyze the core samples, determining the hardness of the rock, and then ignite ‘shape charges’ to create the base’s shell, or to expand on pre-existing cave systems. Many of Phil’s lectures were filled with stories of his team uncovering ancient Atlantean caverns and technology discarded by the extinct race.

Before his death, Phil began lecturing on the specifics and locations of these underground bases, which would pose an obvious national security risk for the United States.

The Dulce Fight of 1979

There is a deep underground base in Dulce, New Mexico, that is pretty well known by now. Entrances to the base can be spotted on Google Earth with a few clicks of the mouse; it was here that Phil claims to have had his first taste of combat.

Phil Schneider worked in the Dulce Base in Dulce, New Mexico. This is the base’s supposed location. Source.

According to Schneider, sometime in 1979, a firefight broke out deep underground, and out of the sixty-four humans involved in the fight, Phil was one out of the four who survived, but just barely.

The opponents that killed both Delta Force operators and Special Forces soldiers were the “seven-foot-tall, big-nosed Greys,” an alien race that traveled to Earth after the First World War from their home planet in the Zeta Reticuli star system.

Phil barely escaped the underground slaughter, but lost three fingers, suffered intense radiation burns and poisoning, and lost his left lung when his ribs were cut open by the “cobalt radiation gun” used by one of the Greys.

Photo by Stephen Leonardi on Unsplash

Murder or Suicide?

According to Phil’s ex-wife Cynthia, the autopsy performed by Dr Karen Gunson was full of “so many discrepancies”, that she felt it was “not his body” at all. Aliens or not, we can’t deny that Cynthia has a point. The report failed to include any notes about Phil’s plastic sternum, the metal plate inside his head, a recent tracheotomy tube, and that he was missing an entire lung.

Cynthia and other supporters believe that this was done intentionally, as a cover-up, and it may be, but it also could have been a rushed job of Dr Gunson, perhaps expecting she was dealing with a stroke victim.

The most important element that both Dr Gunson and Detective Harris failed to spot was a rubber tube (most likely of Phil’s catheter) wrapped around his neck three times, ending in a double knot.

Discovered by the mortician was the true cause of death; a tube wrapped around Phil Schneider’s neck three times. Source (uncensored photo)

Being a heavier set man and in the ‘bloating stage’, which happens around day ten of decomposition, this garrote was only visible after Phil’s body had been resting inside the mortician’s refrigerator, which reduced the swelling affects.

After this discovery, Phil Schneider’s cause of death was changed from a stroke to “strangulation by ligature asphyxiation,” by suicide. However, many have wondered if someone would really commit this act in such a manner. Schneider had certainly other means of committing suicide in an easier fashion available to him: guns, pain killers, medications for his illnesses… could a man in a wheelchair with three fingers missing on one hand really tie a garrote and knot it around his own neck to end his life?


Author’s note: So, that was a lot to process, I know. However, Phil Schneider’s story is much deeper than what I presented here. If you want to dive deeper into this rabbit hole and read things like, mind control, human programming known as ‘debriefing’, the New World Order, translating Reptilian language, “lethal hands,” black card clearances, Atlantean technology, the Schumann Resonance, and believe me, a ton more, than I suggest checking out the book that I read to prepare this article called The Philadelphia Murder, by Alexandra Bruce.

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